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NIC’s Frontline Learning Center Extends e-Learning to Correctional Line Staff
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By Scott Weygandt, Management and Program Analyst, National Corrections Academy, U.S. Department of Justice, National Institute of Corrections, Aurora, Colorado

In this article, NIC Management and Program Analyst Scott Weygandt describes NIC's Frontline Learning Center, Frontline webpagewhich was launched in 2012. Frontline is a free, online learning resource for front-line/first-line staff, such as correctional officers, detention officers, probation and parole officers, re-entry specialists, and correctional health professionals.

As of December 2012, 2,372 correctional line staff have signed up for an account, and they have completed more than 6,000 online courses. About half of the learners who have enrolled to date work in detention agencies.

Frontline currently offers more than 90 e-courses on a variety of topics, including corrections-specific skills and knowledge plus interpersonal communication, writing and grammar, computer technology, personal development, leadership, team skills, and more. Most of the courses are between 30 minutes and 2 hours in length.

Agency managers and trainers can incorporate Frontline e-learning programs into their training plans for staff. There is no cost to use the Frontline Learning Center for eligible corrections professionals.




Posted Wed, Dec 26 2012 9:25 AM by Susan Powell

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