You are not signed in! To post comments and participate in discussions you need to sign in or create a free account.
Parole Essentials: Shaping Parole in the 21st Century
Thinking About Corrections

Subscribe

Paroling authorities play a critical role in correctional systems nationwide. They make thousands of decisions each year about the timing of release from prison for a significant number of offenders. They set conditions of release and respond to violations of post-release supervision for many thousands more.

Recognizing this critical role, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is engaged in a major initiative to develop useful resources for parole board chairs, members, and their executive staff. In 2008, the initiative sponsored the development of the Comprehensive Framework for Paroling Authorities in an Era of Evidence-Based Practice (Campbell 2008).The Comprehensive Framework provides an overview of how the role of paroling authorities is, and should be, changing to meet the challenges facing the corrections field as it looks forward to the second decade of the 21st century.

Next, NIC commissioned a series of five papers on parole entitled Parole Essentials: A Practical Guide for Parole Leaders, which address the current and very specific challenges facing those who chair or sit as members of paroling authorities and executive staff. Core Competencies: A Resource for Parole Board Chairs, Members, and Executive Staff is the first in this series. Subsequent publications in the Parole Essentials series address evidence-based decision-making for paroling authority members, strategic management, and supervising special populations.

These papers were developed as part of a larger NIC initiative to provide current information and guidance to paroling authorities.

Note: The 5 Parole Essentials documents are only available by download.

***************

*********

For additonal information, visit NIC's Parole Resources page.




Posted Thu, May 3 2012 9:59 AM by Anonymous

Comments

Be the first to comment on this article!
You must sign in or create an account to comment.
Brought to you by:
National Institute of Corrections
U.S. Dept. of Justice | 320 First Street | Washington, DC 20534 | 800.995.6423

This blog is funded by a contract from the National Institute of Corrections, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view or opinions stated in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.