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    Information Center News

    New Resource on Pregnancy and Child-Related Legal and Policy Issues About 200,000 women are incarcerated in the United States. An estimated 5 percent of women enter a jail or prison while pregnant. The care of incarcerated women offenders requires a facility to consider a number of medical issues unique to that population, including pregnancy and childcare challenges. A new document by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) titled Pregnancy and Child-Related Legal and Policy Issues Concerning...
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    Where Excellence Starts with Training: Recognizing Richard Geaither’s 26 Years of Service

    The acronym for the WEST Region of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Academy Division where Richard Geaither spent the last six years, “Where Excellence Starts with Training” means just that. In working toward achievement of NIC’s mission, Geaither’s work as a correctional program specialist always focused on achieving excellence in the field by providing training and development to fellow NIC professionals and others connected to the corrections field, including...
    Posted to Corrections from the Field by Donna Ledbetter on Tue, Dec 31 2013
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    Inmate Behavior Management Reduces Misconducts and Grievances

    What is Inmate Behavior Management ? Simply put, it is when corrections officers don’t just observe inmates’ behavior, they manage it through the use of rewards, punishments, and sometimes compassion. Early results from an inmate behavior management program in Northampton County’s female unit show that they went from six misconducts in three month to just one. In Texas, a male block has seen about a 46% drop in misconducts and about a 28% drop in grievances. Could inmate behavior...
    Posted to NIC News & Updates by Billy on Fri, Jun 25 2010
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    Social Networking - Be in the Bleachers or Be in the Game!

    We met in an ACA workshop on Sunday with about 50 professionals in correctional management and learning.Great workshop, thanks to the participants!It was about embracing applications of social networking and supporting technology. One theme was echoed loud and clear.Social networking technology is here and here to stay. Participants were put to work identifying applications for Wikis, Blogs, Social Networking and Video Sharing. We generated a starter list for correctional applications. Wikis; to...
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    How mental health program efforts converts to $$$ saved

    Reported by Scott Weygandt, NIC Last month, the 18th Judicial District's Mental Health Court celebrated its first anniversary, trumpeting tens of thousands of dollars in savings to taxpayers. The program, a collaboration between the staffs at Arapahoe/Douglas Mental Health Network and the 18th Judicial District, diverts the mentally ill away from prison. The goal, those behind it say, is to shut the revolving door that moves the mentally ill in and out of jail or prison but rarely addresses the...
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    Change Talk: Using Motivational Interviewing Techniques in Jail Programs

    By Jamie Allen, Offender Services Manager, Louisville Metro Department of Corrections, Louisville, Kentucky Allen writes, Louisville Metro Department of Corrections (LMDC) recently embarked upon a journey to change its program model to incorporate evidence-based practices and knowledge of “what works” nationally in the field of corrections. For years, our program model has included educational instruction and testing, substance abuse treatment, life skills courses, and spiritual groups...
    Posted to National Jail Exchange by Susan Powell on Fri, May 27 2011
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    Just Released – NIC’s FY 2010 Report to the Nation

    From Morris Thigpen, National Institute of Corrections Director: In this report, NIC is pleased to highlight its success in meeting constituent needs during fiscal year 2010. We responded to a number of requests for technical assistance, revived the NIC Office of Public Health, and migrated many of our print publications into a fully online format. We have also developed and nurtured an increasing number of partnerships with industry stakeholders, which we hope will enhance our ability to meet the...
    Posted to NIC News & Updates by Susan Powell on Wed, Jun 29 2011
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    Recent Ruling Highlights Transgender Issues in Corrections

    Reported from the Associated Press , U.S. District Judge Mark Wolf ruled that the state prison officials in Massachusetts must provide taxpayer-funded sex-reassignment surgery for Michelle Kosilek, a transgender inmate serving a life sentence for murder. Judge Wolf determined in his ruling that surgery was the “only adequate treatment” for Kosilek. Testimony by the Massachusetts Department of Correction’s medical experts was in support of the need for surgery as treatment. Although...
    Posted to Thinking About Corrections by Susan Powell on Wed, Sep 5 2012
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    NIC Director Recognized by Women Executives

    The Executive Committee of the Association of Women Executives in Corrections (AWEC) annually presents the Legacy Award to an outstanding professional who has supported the development and contributions of senior and executive women in corrections. AWEC represents over 200 women in leadership throughout the United States. Director Thigpen has been the agency head of the National Institute of Corrections for over 15 years and has been responsible for ensuring that the National Institute of Corrections...
    Posted to NIC News & Updates by Anonymous on Thu, Aug 26 2010
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    Gender, Race, and Mental Illness in the Criminal Justice System

    By Melissa Thompson ABSTRACT: Mentally ill persons are increasingly being confined in American jails and prisons. Social factors such as gender and race have generally been ignored in assessments of this rising penal population. This article examines race- and gender-related factors in the criminal justice treatment of mentally ill persons. Using federal and local statistics on the hospitalization and/ or incarceration of mentally ill persons, this article finds that psychiatric need is not the only...
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    Close to Home: Building on Family Support for People Leaving Jail

    Most reentry projects focus on the obstacles incarcerated people face after leaving prisons, but the Family Justice Program’s Close to Home project focuses on reentry for the jail population. In a recent survey, the project explored the use of the Relational Inquiry Tool (RIT), a questionnaire originally designed for the prison population, in three Maryland and Wisconsin jails. RIT assists the incarcerated in thinking of family and community members as supportive resources when leaving their...
    Posted to NIC News & Updates by Anonymous on Thu, Oct 13 2011
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    MEDIA ADVISORY: National Institute of Corrections to Hold Public Hearing on Corrections

    MEDIA ADVISORY NOVEMBER 2–3, 2011 WASHINGTON, D.C.—On November 2–3, 2011, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will hold a public hearing on corrections. The hearing, titled Shifting the Focus to Reshape Our Thinking toward Performance-Based Outcomes, will be at Stanford University in Paul Brest Hall and address the topic of organizational culture and change in the correctional environment. Scheduled speakers include more than 20 experts in criminal justice, public safety...
    Posted to NIC News & Updates by Billy on Wed, Oct 26 2011
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    New to the NIC Website – Motivational Interviewing Resources

    Recently added to the National Institute of Corrections website, you will find a new Popular Topics page on Motivational Interviewing (MI) resources. This MI webpage contains links to NIC library resources, trainings, videos, and to related websites on motivational interviewing and evidence-based practices. Also, a new addition to the NIC library and the MI webpage is an annotated MI bibliography of motivational interviewing publications with a focus on criminal justice. This annotated bibliography...
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    New to the NIC Website – Employment Retention Initiative

    Recently added to the National Institute of Corrections website, you will find a new Projects page on NIC’s Employment Retention initiative. This webpage contains links to NIC library resources, trainings, videos, and to related websites on the subject of employment retention. Also, a new addition to the NIC library and linked to the Employment Retention webpage is a recording of the satellite broadcast: Offender Employment Retention: Worth the Work . This broadcast originally aired on November...
    Posted to NIC News & Updates by Susan Powell on Wed, Nov 30 2011
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    Join the Learning Administrators’ Virtual Community (LAVC) Kick-Off Conference

    NIC has launched a new forum on the Corrections Community for learning administrators across the field of corrections. It is called the Learning Administrators' Virtual Community (LAVC) and will open its forum with a kick-off conference online December 5, 2011 from 10 am to 2 pm EST. Dozens of instructors from jails, prisons, and community supervision are already registered, but there is still time to save your seat today. The webinar is open to anyone who administers training in corrections...
    Posted to NIC News & Updates by Susan Powell on Thu, Dec 1 2011
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