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New in the Library - Handbook on Women and Imprisonment
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From the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, this 2014 document, Handbook on Women and Imprisonment, focuses on “female prisoners and guidance on the components of a gender-sensitive approach to prison management, taking into account the typical background of female prisoners and their special needs as women in prison".

The handbook is divided into four chapters.

  • Chapter 1—The Special Needs of Female Offenders: including gender-specific and health-care needs; safety in prison; accommodation and family contact; and post-release reintegration.
  • Chapter 2—Management of Women's Prisons: such as gender-sensitive prison management; prisoner activities and programs; pregnant women and women with children in prison; and monitoring women's prisons.
  • Chapter 3—Reducing the Female Prison Population by Reforming Legislation and Practice—Suggested Measures.
  • Chapter 4—Research, Planning, Evaluation, and Public Awareness-Raising.

Access the full handbook

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This announcement is available at NIC's Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls.  Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues.  Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe.

For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC’s Women Offenders.




Posted Tue, May 19 2015 6:00 AM by Susan Powell
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