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Crime Victims Rights Week begins 4/10/16
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Every year in April, the Office for Victims of Crime helps lead communities throughout the country in their annual observances of National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW), which will be observed April 10–16, 2016. This year's theme—Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope.—underscores the importance of early intervention and victim services in establishing trust with victims, which in turn begins to restore their hope for healing and recovery.

This year’s NCVRW Resource Guide highlights how serving victims and building trust restores hope and strengthens communities. The Guide contains a vibrant array of theme artwork that is available for organizations to incorporate into their outreach materials. View the 2016 NCVRW sample proclamation to help inspire the community, raise awareness of victims’ rights, and address unmet needs.

DSC_1943The National Institute of Corrections sponsors a Victim Service Providers network focused on post-conviction services for victims in areas such as notification, safety, restitution, and victim rights. NIC also participates in and supports the annual conference for the National Association of Victim Service Professionals in Corrections. This year’s conference will be held on June 13-17, 2016 in Portland, Oregon.

See resources from NIC for Post-Conviction Victim Service Providers




Posted Thu, Apr 7 2016 6:09 AM by Susan Powell
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This blog is funded by a contract from the National Institute of Corrections, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view or opinions stated in this document are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.