Visit the US Department of Justice
National Institute of Corrections
Corrections Community

A place where all corrections professionals can interact and collaborate.

You are not signed in! To post comments and participate in discussions you need to sign in or create a free account.

Motivating Ex-Offenders for Employment

This post has 41 Replies | 30 Followers

Not Ranked
Points 260
standers Posted: Mon, Oct 30 2006 7:50 AM
I am seeking journal articles or research on motivating ex-offenders, who are appear unmotivated.  We are interested in motivation for employment; however, if you are aware of articles on motivating in general, we may be able to relate this to the topic.  Thanks.
Top 75 Contributor
Level 3 MVP
Points 4,224

There are many resources on offenders and employment on the National Institute of Corrections website www.nicic.org

and you can try the U.S. Department of Labor;  these are documents on the NIC website as examples.

       http://www.ppv.org/ppv/publications/assets/194_publication.pdf
       http://www.nicic.org/pubs/2005/period283.pdf
       http://www.aecf.org/initiatives/fes/pubs/employment_retention.pdf

Peggy L. Ritchie
Not Ranked
Points 128
You might consider looking at motivational interviewing, www.motivationalinterviewing.org.  Although it was developed for addictive behaviors, its use has been expanded in the past few years and it appears it could be useful for any behavior that one is wanting an offender to change.  NIC will be publishing a monograph on its use in community supervision in early 2007.
Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 61
Janine replied on Sat, Dec 6 2008 11:52 AM
I can only speak for myself, but it seems as if decreasing stigmatization, societal rejection, and implementing programs that actually work to enhance re-entry would be the key motivating factor. When one is bombarded with negativity, and faces insurmountable obstacles regarding obtaining employment that can decrease motivation and self esteem. As studies have shown a low self esteem leads to depression, relapse, and lack of motivation. I am more then motivated in regards to seeking employment. When faced with these barriers and the need to generate an income I created and invented a reality based prison board game called, Parole-Board "The Ultimate Game of Injustice" www.parole-board.com. This game will be my vehicle and others to a successful reintegration. It's all about giving people a chance and treating them with respect to achieve proficiency and motivation.
Not Ranked
Points 44
+ I total agree with your paragraph concerning ex-offenders being treated with dignity and respect and may be their motivation would make them feel better about their self worth and not have to alway be reminded about their past . How can you move furward when your past is always being brought to your future evey time you apply for a job and you see on the application have you ever been convicted of a crime most ex-offenders know I will not be hired here and there correct because it is easy to judge others. I feel like this is why most ex-offenders sometimes returned to a life of crime if I can not find a job to feel my family what's the use.
Janine:
I can only speak for myself, but it seems as if decreasing stigmatization, societal rejection, and implementing programs that actually work to enhance re-entry would be the key motivating factor. When one is bombarded with negativity, and faces insurmountable obstacles regarding obtaining employment that can decrease motivation and self esteem. As studies have shown a low self esteem leads to depression, relapse, and lack of motivation. I am more then motivated in regards to seeking employment. When faced with these barriers and the need to generate an income I created and invented a reality based prison board game called, Parole-Board "The Ultimate Game of Injustice" www.parole-board.com. This game will be my vehicle and others to a successful reintegration. It's all about giving people a chance and treating them with respect to achieve proficiency and motivation.
Janine:
I can only speak for myself, but it seems as if decreasing stigmatization, societal rejection, and implementing programs that actually work to enhance re-entry would be the key motivating factor. When one is bombarded with negativity, and faces insurmountable obstacles regarding obtaining employment that can decrease motivation and self esteem. As studies have shown a low self esteem leads to depression, relapse, and lack of motivation. I am more then motivated in regards to seeking employment. When faced with these barriers and the need to generate an income I created and invented a reality based prison board game called, Parole-Board "The Ultimate Game of Injustice" www.parole-board.com. This game will be my vehicle and others to a successful reintegration. It's all about giving people a chance and treating them with respect to achieve proficiency and motivation.
Janine:
I can only speak for myself, but it seems as if decreasing stigmatization, societal rejection, and implementing programs that actually work to enhance re-entry would be the key motivating factor. When one is bombarded with negativity, and faces insurmountable obstacles regarding obtaining employment that can decrease motivation and self esteem. As studies have shown a low self esteem leads to depression, relapse, and lack of motivation. I am more then motivated in regards to seeking employment. When faced with these barriers and the need to generate an income I created and invented a reality based prison board game called, Parole-Board "The Ultimate Game of Injustice" www.parole-board.com. This game will be my vehicle and others to a successful reintegration. It's all about giving people a chance and treating them with respect to achieve proficiency and motivation.
Top 150 Contributor
Level 2 MVP
Points 546
Dave Koch replied on Tue, Aug 25 2009 8:18 PM
Brian went to visit his friend, Courtney. As they were talking and enjoying the fresh lemonade that Courtney made, Brian noticed her dog Penelope, lying in a corner, quietly whimpering, making slight adjustments to her position and letting out an occasional painful sounding yelp. “What’s wrong with Penelope?” Brain asked Courtney. “Oh,” Courtney replied, “There’s a rusty nail sticking up out of the floor over there and she’s laying right on it.” With a puzzled look on his face, Brian asked, “Then why doesn’t she just move and lay someplace else?” Looking over at Penelope, then turning back and looking at Brian, Courtney shrugged her shoulders and said, “I guess it doesn’t hurt enough.” When the nail hurts enough, people will move. Until then, they will continue lying on the same old rusty nail, complaining and whimpering with occasional painful yelps, but never just getting up and moving to a place that is more comfortable. If an individuals’ nail doesn’t hurt enough yet, it will. Hopefully, they will make the decision to get off the nail before they catch a fifteen-year sentence. It is guaranteed that the nail will hurt enough before that sentence is finished, but then they’ll be stuck sitting on that nail until someone else decides it’s time for them to get off of it. Among the greatest challenges for most ex-offenders is simply believing that life after incarceration is possible – the fundamental belief that it is possible for someone to have a life of legitimacy and normalcy after having served time in prison. Many people who are released from prison are fundamentally brainwashed to believe that becoming a card-carrying member of mainstream society is an almost impossible task. I remember hearing all of that rhetoric myself when I was in prison. That is utter propaganda, and the propaganda is frequently proliferated by those who have been in, got out, and then came back – the recidivists. It is harder to get out than it is to be in, but not because of the “barriers” to reentry. I think that the reentry “barriers” are overrated, and largely propaganda that is perpetuated by recidivists. It is always someone else’s fault when someone recidivates. The police were targeting them, their parole officer had it out for them, the judge had a burr, no one would hire them (after maybe a half a dozen interviews), etc. Many offenders, and even staff, listen to these explanations that sound so logical and intelligent. A paradigm exists that provides many ex-offenders with the rationalization they crave so they can justify their tortured argument for not even trying. Indeed, these people are sensitive to the felony label they carry. Unfortunately, they allow that label to dictate their future, and after the first couple of rejections, they just quit and go back to whatever it was they were doing that earned them that felony label. A felony conviction or an incarceration event incorporates a certain amount of collateral damage. Some people call this double jeopardy. I call it reality, and an individual doesn’t have decades to focus their energies on trying to change whatever perceptions society may have. These people need gainful employment – now, and no one is going to beat a path to their door to offer them work. Unless an individual has a dream job lined up, they need to be willing and mentally prepared to accept the job that no one else wants. That will give them a start at rebuilding a resume and a collection of work references. They can climb from there, and they can climb as high as they choose to climb. Whether a person wants one or not, they are going to have a life journey. Where that journey leads depends solely on the choices they make during their journey. A person who has had a conviction or who has been incarcerated is held to a higher standard, and their future opportunities and success are directly dependent on meeting that standard. They need to rise to the occasion. Records are broken by those who dream beyond the barriers. Motivating ex-offenders, who appear unmotivated is much a function of providing the concrete evidence that if they put forth the genuine effort, it won’t be an exercise in futility. There are thousands of ex-offenders who moved on to a legitimate life and enjoy all of life’s rich rewards. If you want more nut and bolts, let me know and I’ll be happy to provide real-life agendas that can help these people develop the motivation to seek and secure gainful employment. But, right now, my best friend is staring me down, and based upon the look on his face, he wants my attention. Another hint is the Frisbee in his mouth and the wagging tail… - Dave

Dave Koch - (614) 364-4085

Not Ranked
Points 49
A game you say . Parole board game gosh I guess thats a good idea . I'll never know cause I'll be homeless in the bushes
Not Ranked
Points 49
I guess I can agree with the jest of your comment , that of facing reality and accept any job you can for survival . I have done that for over 20 years now and I have had zero recidivism . So I am not making excusses as you have seemed to make that your focal point . The fact is what is being done is wrong .To re convict & repunish a person / job applicant is wrong . I will do whatever I have to do regardless . You are the one who has given up on a fair and just society .
replied on Wed, Aug 26 2009 1:40 PM
Hi Dave, I am on my way out the door to an appointment, however I had to write. Yours was the best piece I have read in a long time on motivation and success for ex-offenders. I could not stop reading until I finished, it really seems that what you have to say, offenders, ex-offenders and service providers really need to hear and I do mean really hear. If you could let me know where I could get the real life agendas you mentioned I would be grateful. Thanks for sharing such a powerful example. Cynthia
Top 150 Contributor
Level 2 MVP
Points 546
Dave Koch replied on Wed, Aug 26 2009 2:54 PM
Whether I agree that the system is wrong is immaterial. When faced with the comparative challenges of either changing myself, or changing how society might perceive my past, I elected to take the path of least resistance. Albeit change is a painful process, it held a much greater likelihood of producing positive results than spending a couple of decades trying to change a multi-cultural society. Given the challenges that were already inherent to getting my own life on track, I would question the wisdom of a similarly situated individual deciding to champion a cause that is analogous to moving a mountain. For what it’s worth, I do not perceive it as double jeopardy, a re-conviction or re-punishment. However, as mentioned previously, the existence of a felony conviction does have a certain amount of collateral damage. I don’t know about anyone else, but the only person I have to blame for the collateral damage I have endured is that person who stares back at me every morning in the mirror. I could have chosen to let those scars be my excuse to lie down and suck my thumb, or just deal with it and move on. An individual can also spend the rest of their life trying to change the system, which is fine as long as they have a voracious and eternal appetite for Oscar Myer wieners, macaroni & cheese and spaghetti-o’s. Walking through life and convincing ourselves that society owes us something, or that society needs to change to suit conditions that we created for ourselves – by ourselves - never produces positive or productive results. Rather, it embitters us and is a form of accepting defeat. It’s a cop-out and a lie to your-self. It’s a rationalization for an unwillingness to put forth the extra effort. It’s easier to just say, it’s not my fault for my lot in life. I’m under privileged, I’m being victimized or persecuted, and society owes me. The only thing society owes us is the opportunity to contribute. When I was released, I had the decision and choice whether or not to embrace the opportunity. Here is a reality that every ex-offender needs to think about each and every day. “You are in life exactly where you choose to be.” Put another way, your current situation is a direct result of the choices you have made. Internalize this and think about it often. If you’re not happy with where you are in life, start making different choices. If you do the same things, you will continue to get the same results. If you want to change the results, change what you are doing. People base their initial impressions and judgments of other people on that person’s last act – on their most recent significant. If a person’s most recent significant event is being released from prison, then that will likely form the basis for evaluation by many people. After all, what else is there to judge that person that is material? As an employer, I recognize an ex-offender’s credentials much the same as a recent college graduate. I judge them on the basis of their most recent significant event – going to school, or going to prison, and on their attitude. The only thing that is going to get either of them the break they need is their attitude. Their attitude can get them in the door. Once they’re in, what they do with it is up to them. Both need to prove that they can become an asset and that they are a good investment. I am going to keep an eye on either until I am comfortable that they are performing in a manner that is commensurate with what they are being paid, and consistent with the policies of the company. Taking that job that no one else wants opens the door for opportunity, and that job should be very temporary. Once you take that job that no one else wants, you’ve started the building process of a new and good resume. You have created a new most recent significant event. Either way, that first job that no one else wants will become vacant based upon your decision to perform – you will either get promoted out of that job, you will leave it for a different employer, or you will fail to perform and get fired. You control all of the outcomes, but I guarantee that that first job you take will eventually become a vacancy. Do your best job, maintain a good and positive attitude, and your job will become vacant because you will be promoted. Do a poor job and your position will also become vacant, but the promotion will not likely be a part of the reason. I have not given up on a fair and just society because I never made that my crusade. If an individual is in a position to practice philanthropy and has a lust for altruism, perhaps they can serve as an ambassador for societal change. However, for the ex-offender who is struggling to keep a roof over his/her head and foods on the table, the very suggestion that changing society is their life quest is disingenuous. I confess that I did think about the “I want to change society gig” when I was released and feeling sorry for myself because so many people notably had issues with my convictions. I took the time to really analyze my interest in championing the cause to change society, the system, the double standards, the hypocrisy, etc., and determined that in reality, all I would have been doing is hoping to gain sympathy because I was so persecuted, while simultaneously fabricating what sounded like rational and intelligent explanations for not fully applying myself, and wrapping it all in a veneer of benevolence. - Dave

Dave Koch - (614) 364-4085

Not Ranked
Points 22
Gretta G replied on Wed, Aug 26 2009 7:54 PM
It is not so much motivation for the Ex-Offenders It's the discouragement from society. Yes we committed a crime. Yes we had to pay for that crime. But what happens when you are released into society after paying for your crimes. What happens when people have upbeat conversations with you tell you Youre just the person they have been looking for to fill a position. Then when they find out your a convicted felon the tones of their voices change. They cant seem to get away from you fast enough. After countless job interviews, desperate searches for decent housing any attempt at some normalcy and putting your life back together and become an even better you. Yet society does everything in its ability to crush that. 20 yrears later after serving your time and paying for your mistakes Life and the mentality of society still hinders you. What then?
Top 150 Contributor
Level 2 MVP
Points 546
Dave Koch replied on Wed, Aug 26 2009 10:31 PM
Gretta – I relate to your comments, and I empathize with your perception of how society treats ex-felons. As to your question, “What then?” – the short answer is, you get back up, brush off the dust and charge back after your goal or objective. The long answer is a little more involved. After I was released in early August, 1980, I spent a solid month canvassing office and industrial parks looking for work – any work. I was driving along a back access road through Cleveland Hopkins Airport and noticed a row of small airplanes. It was a flight school. I had a curiosity for airplanes, and because there was this fantasy that I might go to school for aviation based upon an interview I had with a counselor, which I all but completely dismissed as even a realistic possibility, I stopped, parked my car and started walking around looking at the little Cessna 152’s. Admittedly, I also stopped because I was feeling a little beaten up that particular day with the extreme heat and several bombed interviews. I paid little attention to a maintenance man who was mowing the grass. I figured he would eventually come over and kick me off the premises, but until he did, I just kept looking at all of the airplanes. Sure enough, I noticed the maintenance guy was mowing a path straight in my direction, and when he was within five feet of me, the engine stopped. He hopped off the lawn tractor and walked up to me, looking like he just crawled out of a 110-degree grease pit full of grass – the sweat pouring off of him. Unexpectedly, he greeted me with a broad smile and an enthusiastic, “Hi, how are you! Are you a pilot?” I just laughed and said, “I wish!” “Well, this place is a flight school,” he said. “If you want to learn, they can teach you.” He reached out his hand and introduced himself, “I’m John Kovach.” I shook hands and said, “Hi John, I’m Dave Koch.” His voice was pleasant, he was easy going, and for some reason, he just seemed like he was genuinely interested in me. “Are you interested in learning how to fly?” John asked. I said, “Well, I have a few limitations.” “Like what,” he asked. “Well, money for one – it’s pretty thin right now,” I responded. He rubbed his chin for a few seconds in thought and said, “There are all kinds of student loans, grants and other programs that can help pay for training, so that can be taken care of.” There must have been something in my demeanor, a look on my face, something that he noticed – that it wasn’t just about the money. He asked, “What else is holding you back?” I just responded with a shrug of my shoulders and said, “I just don’t think my future includes getting a pilot’s license.” This man of probably sixty-plus years must have felt something in his gut. He put his hand on my shoulder and in a warm personal tone that felt like it was coming from God, he said, “Tell me your story son – maybe I can help.” We walked over to a couple of chairs that were placed in front of one of the hangers. He went inside and came out with a couple bottles of soda. As he handed me a soda, he said in a really gentle tone, “Tell me your story son.” He sat and just looked at me – totally silent – smiling and not at all intimidating. As I sat there, sipping the cold soda, I looked in his eyes. His expression was one that made me feel like no matter what I said, he wouldn’t pass judgment. What the hell, I thought. I’ll probably never see this guy again for the rest of my life. There’s no loss in telling him and besides, he just bought me a soda that I couldn’t have afforded to buy myself. I looked at him and said, “I don’t think they give pilot licenses to guys who just got out of the can.” His eyes smiled almost as though he knew what I needed to tell him. “Prison or just county jail,” he asked. “Oh, it was the real McCoy,” I replied, “Both federal and state.” John rubbed his chin for probably a minute as he thought. Then he said, “I don’t think that would pose any limitations. I’m pretty familiar with the Federal Aviation Regulations and I cannot think of any that would prevent you from pursuing an aviation career.” Then he asked, “What did you do?” Since I wasn’t interviewing for a job, I didn’t dance around the question. I just gave him the full report. No face-down cards – no hidden agendas – I just laid it out and spilled my guts. He listened intently. I saw real and deep concern in his eyes as he listened and rubbed his chin the entire time. After I finished, John asked, “So, what are you doing now?” I explained that I had been looking for work – a job – any job. “Any luck?” he asked. I just shook my head, no. “So, you’re available to work,” he asked. “Definitely,” I replied. John looked at me and smiled and asked, “Do you think you could cut the grass?” I shook my head and said, “Sure!” Inside, my first thoughts were, geezzz, a job cutting grass? Is this my destiny? As for getting a pilots license, I thought that was a pretty far-fetched assertion. But, a job and income sounded good, even if it wasn’t the greatest job in the world. John went on asking, “How about keeping the hangers clean, scrubbing the hanger floors, washing the airplanes, fueling airplanes and keeping the offices clean?” The whole time John was posing these questions, I just kept shaking my head and replying, “Yes, sure, yes, sure.” John took the last swig from his soda and said, “Good, when can you start?” I was silent for a few seconds and just stared at him. Then I said, “Well, I appreciate that sir, but I wouldn’t want to take your job from you.” He just smiled and said, “Oh, that’s okay, I have plenty of other things to keep me busy.” A little puzzled, I gestured and asked, “Like what?” He calmly replied, “Oh, I’m the president of this company, I own this flight school, and I’m a FAA Examiner.” If you’re serious about wanting to get your pilot’s license, I can help you with that too.” As he was walking away, he looked back at me, smiled and winked and said, “I know this might not be your dream job, but look at the bright side of it – you’re starting out with presidential duties. I’ll see you next Monday at 8:00 AM sharp.” It turns out that John was also a retired Cleveland Police Officer having served a couple of decades on the force. The flight school was his second passion and career. Perhaps this accounted for his perception that my issue was more than just money. Looking at this guy, you wouldn’t think he had two nickels to rub together. To abbreviate the story, he hired me, and he and his wife helped me with securing some student loans and grants, along with another individual, which is a story in itself. I cut the grass, I washed the airplanes, I cleaned the hangers, I pumped fuel, and I learned to fly. This was the beginning of a rewarding career as a captain flying some of the finest corporate jets on the planet. Think about why the president of that flight school was cutting the grass, cleaning the hangers, washing airplanes and fueling airplanes. It is because those were jobs that needed to be done, but they were jobs that no one else wanted. Be willing to take that job that no one else wants. It can lead to great things… Although this first job may not have been my ideal career choice, I took pride in my work. I never missed a day of work, I was never late, I was responsible and I was accountable. When I washed an airplane, it looked like it just rolled off the factory floor. I even took the time to clean the instrument faces with Q-Tips. The flight instructors and the customers frequently commented on what a great job I was doing and how good the fleet of training aircraft looked. I took the same time and pride when I cleaned the hangers. My meticulous work habits paid off. The day I took my FAA flight check ride and received my flight instructor’s certificate, the Boss congratulated me and said, “Wear a shirt and tie to work tomorrow. Tomorrow, you’re a flight instructor.” Taking that first crummy job is a little tough on the pride. Call it double jeopardy, or collateral damage, or call it whatever you want. I called it reality. You don’t have a great deal of control over that. You do however have total control over whether or not you earn pay raises and promotions. That is controlled by how you perform in that first job. Provided that you perform to the best of your ability, even if you do not receive the promotions and pay raises you have earned, you have acquired the experience and good references that you can take to a new employer. Did all of this just happen by luck? Was it because the opportunity found me, or was it because I found the opportunity? I was simply out there and available, so when an opportunity came along, I was poised and positioned to see it. When the opportunity became available, I was available to seize it. Just get out there. But, this is only part of the significance of my story. Besides just being out there and making yourself available to opportunity, another key here is this. I didn’t feel nervous talking to John Kovach [the maintenance guy] who was mowing the lawn at the flight school because I perceived him to be just a maintenance man – not the president and owner of the business. When John asked, “What is your story son,” I just laid it out and told him – spilled my guts out. I didn’t sugar coat it, I didn’t hide any of it, I didn’t dance around it, and I didn’t try to justify it or blame anyone else for it. I just laid it out. I was totally and brutally honest. John apparently sensed my candor, and when he did, he opened up his arms and offered to help. It made him feel good because, together we were going to go out and conquer these challenges. And we did. People want to be a savior; they want to rescue other people from distress. You can use your conviction and your status as an underdog as a tool. From that moment forward, I have just simply been completely open and forthright about my past. If asked about my conviction, I disclose it – fully and without anything hidden. Even if not asked about it, if the circumstances dictate that the other party may have the right to know, I disclose it before fully consummating whatever agreements are on the table. If you want more specifics on my interviewing techniques, let me know. One of the things I have made a habit of doing when I’m feeling a little beaten up, is to think about people like Christopher Reeves. Indeed, What then? - Dave

Dave Koch - (614) 364-4085

Not Ranked
Points 49
I have gone thru the same process many times and find myself unemployed again . I'm 57 now so zero help from soc sec . This is a big subject when you look at the cause and how to right the injustice . The only way I can imagine it will change is thru saturation in society in time every family will have a sex offender of there own then Only then will the hatred end . Until then I look for work where nobody wants to go dirty dangerous little sweat shops .Maybe a swine flu out break will clear the job market
Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 61
Janine replied on Wed, Sep 2 2009 10:12 AM
Hey persecuted ,let me know which bush you're at and I can try and drop my game, Parole-Board, by. Is it near maple drive, oak ave ,or weeping willow way. I believe in having fun no matter what your envirnment dictates. Have a great day and stay away from the berries.
Top 150 Contributor
Level 2 MVP
Points 546
Dave Koch replied on Wed, Sep 2 2009 10:15 AM
Eloquent and poetic...

Dave Koch - (614) 364-4085

Top 150 Contributor
Level 2 MVP
Points 546
Dave Koch replied on Wed, Sep 23 2009 2:06 PM
I was participating in this discussion, however there appears to be a limitation on the length of postings. Brevity is not among my strong points. The subject of ex-Offender employment is critical, as community reentry is substantially a function of economics. I have re-published the relevant parts of the discussion along with the post I had written, but was unable to publish due to its length. My last post appears at the bottom of the thread. I would encourage a continuation of this discussion, which I am happy to host at http://www.dkoch.net/dkoch/Daves_Blog/Daves_Blog.html

Dave Koch - (614) 364-4085

Not Ranked
Points 44
This is a very interesting story and a great opportunity that was available to this individual and this happens very rarely in life and this person was in the right place at the right time but come on life is not this simple. I am not saying this can not happen but not every ex-offender will have this chance but I do say get up and dust yourself off and dare not to stay down.
Top 150 Contributor
Level 2 MVP
Points 546
Dave Koch replied on Thu, Oct 8 2009 11:17 AM
Carolyn Hodge:
This is a very interesting story and a great opportunity that was available to this individual and this happens very rarely in life and this person was in the right place at the right time but come on life is not this simple. I am not saying this can not happen but not every ex-offender will have this chance but I do say get up and dust yourself off and dare not to stay down.




I find that the rarity of opportunity directly coincides with the rarity of actively seeking opportunity. I choose not to make seeking opportunity a rarity...

Dave Koch - (614) 364-4085

Not Ranked
Points 154
For the internal motivation, see my "rear view mirror" illustration on my website. I find reminding them of what's in the rearview mirror is past, they'll miss what's ahead of them (front windshield).
Terry at www.tlcyouthservices.net
Not Ranked
Points 5
jtrockit replied on Fri, Feb 19 2010 8:55 PM
Hello, I need info. on how I can receive help for employment in New York. My charge was over 8 years ago and I have had a good employment until I was let go last May 2009. Now I am having a difficult time trying to get hired. Can anybody give me any positive help? I am almost out of unemployment insurance and now working on my savings. Please any info. for New York would be great. Thank you.
Page 1 of 3 (42 items) 1 2 3 Next > | RSS