Visit the US Department of Justice
National Institute of Corrections
Corrections Community

A place where all corrections professionals can interact and collaborate.

You are not signed in! To post comments and participate in discussions you need to sign in or create a free account.

Motivating Ex-Offenders for Employment

This post has 41 Replies | 30 Followers

Not Ranked
Points 27
JEROME28 replied on Wed, May 12 2010 9:02 PM

I think a planner should do two things on this subject, focus on what inmates can do with the skills they obtained while in jail. Bpo.gov stated that their serval program out their that will enhance job skills. We are in a goal driven economy, as well as world that really builds confidence, inmates that achieve a different educational status while in jail should have great results!

 

Next thing on the list for the planner is to network with employer's in the area about advantage's of hiring an ex con, i.e. tax breaks and not to mention a qualified worker that has the skill and certification to get the job done.  Now with all the goverment contracts that are given to small business owners as well as corporate entities, a business relationship be started to assist our problem with getting inmates to work after they are released.

 

We want people that are well trained to be put in these situations of oppurtunity for employment. When the planner  speak with their inmates options should be communicated about education, payscales, and simply regaining their lives back.

 If thats not motivation in the purest form I don't what is!

JEROME CHARLES THORNTON

CEO OF THORNTON INC.
Not Ranked
Points 154
I have a powerpoint on this subject from the workforce staff development perspective with motivational interviewing. I'll be glad to send it to you, free! terry
Terry at www.tlcyouthservices.net
Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 15
Please send me the powerpoint that you have. I would love to review it. bjenne@esd.wa.gov
Betty J. Jenne
ESD/OES WSS IV
WorkSource Yakima
306 Division Street
Yakima, WA 98902
Phone: (509) 574-0199
Fax: (509) 573-4558
www.wa.gov/esd/oes

Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 42
Ignovi replied on Mon, Aug 16 2010 7:47 PM
The biggest motivation that I have been able to assist ex-offenders with is helping them to regain their life through the legal process of criminal record sealing, expungement, or clemency/pardon petitions. Just last week, I was dealing with an ex-offender in the State of North Carolina that had consulted several attorneys in the state who all told her that there was nothing that could be done. Within 20 minutes I had renewed her hope by providing her the details and the process in which she would have to follow in order to get her one time conviction removed from her record with an expungement. Needless to say, she is now a client of Ignovi (www.ignovi.com). The biggest motivation for the vast majority of people that I deal with is hope. Hope that they will have the chance to resume a normal life. Now obviously Ignovi cannot help every ex-offender in the United States. Some crimes (typically violent crimes) we will not deal with at all. However, per the 2008 statistical data report from the Dept. of Justice, 85% of all arrest are considered non-violent. This allows Ignovi to help the vast majority of people in seeking legal services that can dramatically affect their lives and their loved ones. With the difficulty that so many people have in gaining employment (even without an arrest or conviction on their record) the aspect of clearing those past issues is immensely important. No one state is identical, just as most every ex-offender will have the exact same scenario for their petition package. That is why Ignovi was created in the first place. Yes, there are other services out there claiming to be able to help with expungement of criminal records. Ignovi acknowledges that they exist however we are dramatically different from the aspect that we realize the differences in each state and know the best possible solutions based upon that knowledge. Ignovi has only found a few attorneys within the United States that specialize in this practice. And of those attorney's we can honestly say we are better than them. Ignovi is not limited to one state or only dealing with arrest records that need to be expunged (which is the vast majority of the attorneys we have found). We are clear cut in our process, focused on the outcome for each client and provide inspiration to those that we work with. So to anyone who may be reading this posting, we invite you (or your attorney if applicable) to contact us at www.ignovi.com and we can discuss in detail the services offered and the ability to help you regain your life.
Not Ranked
Points 71
This sounds like an advertisement and frankly I have been around long enough to see newly fashioned hope dashed when offenders discover that nothing is ever completely erased. Records still exist although their source may be sealed, people still ask questions and expect a truthful answer, memories fade slowly. I agree that hope is a tremendous motivator, but continuing to hide from your past may not be the right answer. I believe that the best application of expungement is to erase charges where there has been no true bill or that were disposed of in favor of the defendant. These clutter up ones record and really should be erased. Otherwise there is a related process -- removing the civil disability of infamy. In states where offenders are declared infamous for life (like Tennessee where we operate), offenders need to petition the court to have their rights restored.
Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 42
Ignovi replied on Tue, Aug 17 2010 8:29 AM

Timothy,

This portion comes directly from the State of Tennessee's statues:

Pardon application form (available from the Board), provides that an applicant must have completed sentence, including any period of community supervision. In addition, the Governor “will give serious consideration” to pardon requests where: 1) applicant has had no conviction for five years since completion of sentence for which he seeks pardon; 2) applicant has “demonstrated good citizenship,” which means “both specific achievements and incident-free behavior;” and 3) petition has demonstrated with proper verification a specific and compelling need for a pardon.

Pardon has limited legal effect, and does not restore civil or other rights lost under state law, and is not entered into a law enforcement database. An individual who receives a pardon that restores full rights of citizenship must still petition the court for restoration. § 40-29-105(c).

Judicial Restoration of Rights: Tenn. Code Ann. § 40-29-101 provides a procedure through which "[p]ersons rendered infamous or deprived of the rights of citizenship by the judgment of any state or federal court may have their full rights of citizenship restored by the circuit court."

Pretrial diversion, exoneration: Tenn. Code Ann. § 40-15-102 through 106. Misdemeanants and Class D felony offenders who have had no prior deferral (ex. sex offenders) may be placed on probation for up to two years. Upon successful conclusion the court will expunge record. Convictions may also be expunged in case where there has been an “exoneration” from Governor in case of innocence. § 40-27-109(a).

Nonconviction records: Tenn. Code Ann. § 40-32-101(A). Court may order “destruction” of records in case of acquittal, or where charges dismissed.

So as you can see to your post, we are not about just advertising as you had indicated but rather instilling hope which was the purpose of the thread I had responded to. By utilizing the laws in each state to instill faith into people that there may be a chance to get a fresh start in life is not an advertisement.

Not Ranked
Points 22
Terry, Could you send me the powerpoint you have on motivating ex-offenders for employment? I would like to preview what you have. I appreciate your promptness. Happy New Year!
Not Ranked
Points 154
Hello Mary, I had to block the website due to spam. Can you email at terrycarlile@yahoo.com? And see my website www.tlcworkforcesolutions.com Thank you, terry
Terry at www.tlcyouthservices.net
Not Ranked
Points 154
Due to the spam from this site (not the site's fault); contact me directly at terrycarlile@yahoo.com. See our website www.tlcworkforcesolutions.com The main offerings for your work will be the job readiness; rear view mirror illustration and other resources (many free!) Thank you for your work! Terry
Terry at www.tlcyouthservices.net
Not Ranked
Points 5
rwillwerth replied on Sun, Feb 20 2011 10:59 AM
While I agree that sometimes we let the felony label dictate our attitude towards employment, I worked for four years gainfully employed wile carrying the stigma of being a sex offender. sadly I lost that job and ever since it has been a desperate struggle to find gainful employment. My current job only pays $8 / hour. I havent made a wage like that since high school. When will society understand that many of us genuinely want to rebuild our lives and be contributing members of society. And a gainfully employed felon will be vastly less likely to reoffend which is what our goal as a society ought to be. Sadly most recently, due to my severe anxiety I somehow missed my registration window and was arrested for failure to report. I was at my local PD to change my address in my file, and found out the bad news. Having a hard time wrapping my brain around I could have forgotten. I am hoping for the best.
Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 61
Janine replied on Sun, Mar 6 2011 7:16 PM

The rear view mirror illustration works well when it involves you.  Although when others are involved a majority of them focus on the "rear view mirror" especially if you are a felon, and that image appears larger. 

Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 61
Janine replied on Sun, Mar 6 2011 7:21 PM

The "rear view mirror" theory works well when it involves yourself.  Although society seems to focus on that rear view mirror especially when your a felon and appear larger.

Not Ranked
Points 22

Just few days ago, I have read a awesome article on motivating ex-offenders. I am searching it now and if it is found I will give you the source.  

Not Ranked
Points 22

standers:
I am seeking journal articles or research on motivating ex-offenders, who are appear unmotivated.  We are interested in motivation for employment; however, if you are aware of articles on motivating in general, we may be able to relate this to the topic.  Thanks.

I read a article on that topic few days ago. I am searching that again for you and hope very soon I am going to give you

 

Not Ranked
Points 22

Yes, I have seen this. Nice job man.

Not Ranked
Points 22

I have read this. Nice job man.

Not Ranked
Points 39

I am a registered sexual offender in the state of North Carolina. I am 28 years old currently and I am having an extrodenarly hard time finding employment. Perhaps a bit of background information will be helpful. In 2003 I was convicted of 3 counts of indecent liberties with a minor. At the time I was convicted I had just turned 20 and the victim was 14 years of age. Since then I have completed all required specifications of my probation which has since ended. In 2007 I married the girl that I recieved the charges over and we now have a 4 year old son. Is there any way that I can get things straight so that I can support my wife and child?

Not Ranked
Points 5
anton replied on Sat, Nov 12 2011 2:05 AM

nice info

Not Ranked
Level 1 MVP
Points 35
Juven Cuui replied on Mon, Nov 14 2011 10:59 PM

Best wishes for you and your son!

Not Ranked
Points 27
Maggie replied on Wed, Jun 20 2012 1:09 PM

Dave... Great story.  Thanks for sharing.  I'm going to read it to my inpatient rehab students. 

There was a woman with a felony record in one of my classes who was very passionate about her piercings and tattoos.  She didn't understand the prejudice that still exists nor was she willing to "change who she was or her right to express herself."  In our classes we talk about doing whatever it takes (legally/ethically) to earn an income, including doing odd jobs and starting businesses.  So, as the group discussion progressed and this woman became more and more adamant about her "rights," the group came up with a great idea...  maybe she can start a non-profit whose focus is educating society and helping to make piercings and tattoos more accepted.  If she needed to fight the fight, at least she could create an income at the same time.  You're right, we can fight the fight and face homelessness and hunger or move through the not-s-fair societal system and get a job. 

Maggie

Vocational Director

Progress House, Inc.

 

Page 2 of 3 (42 items) < Previous 1 2 3 Next > | RSS